Industrial Technology

General

Orientation to Industrial Technology

This course is designed to introduce students to the various areas in industrial technology. The course includes, but is not limited to the concepts from small engines, woods, metals, drafting/design, and electronics. Exposure to the technologies associated with these courses will provide orientation, background and experience needed to pursue skill‑level industrial technology programs.

Semesters:  2, but a 1 semester option is available at some sites.
Level: 9, 10
Credit:  1/2 per semester
Prerequisite:  None

Introduction to Technical Design & Drafting (Drafting I)

This introductory course in technical drawing is designed primarily for the student with no previous drafting experience.  A beginning course in mechanical and architectural drafting utilizing primarily computer aided drafting software in which the student will study the need and use of drafting in industry. Students will learn to make simple sketches and drawings involving the use of shape description, size description, geometric construction, orthographic projection, pictorial drawing, and simple auxiliaries. Career opportunities in the drafting industry will be explored.  Click link to learn more about articulated credit for this course.

Semesters: 1
Level:  9, 10, 11, 12
Credit:  1/2 (Articulated Credit)
Prerequisite:  None

Technical Design & Drafting (Drafting II)

This course is a continuation of Introduction to Technical Design and Drafting. Students will continue their work on sketches and drawings involving the use of shape description, size description, geometric construction, pictorial drawing, and simple auxiliaries. In addition, students will be exposed to simple reverse engineering concepts and assignments.  Click link for more information on articulated credit for this course.

Semesters: 1
Level:  9, 10, 11, 12
Credit:  1/2 (Articulated Credit)
Prerequisite: Introduction to Technical Design and Drafting

Mechanical Engineering & Design (Drafting Occupations I)

This course is designed to give the student a broader knowledge of the field of mechanical drafting. It will cover orthographic projection, schematic drawing, blueprinting, working drawings, and assembly drawings. This course provides learning experiences related to the principles, tools, materials, techniques, equipment, and processes utilized in the production and reproduction of drawings, layouts, plans and blueprints.  Emphasis will be placed on three‑dimensional representation using the computer as a drafting tool.  Instruction is provided in freehand sketching, theory of projection, relationship of coordinate planes, object position in relation to planes, projection of straight and curved lines and surfaces, standards and requirements of dimensioning and tolerancing, isometrics of planes and solids, cavalier, cabinet, and general oblique drawing, diametric drawing, picture planes, points of sight, visual rays, and vanishing points in perspective drawing.

Semesters:  2
Level:  10, 11, 12
Credit:  1/2 per semester
Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Introduction to Technical Design and Drafting, as well as Technical Design and Drafting

Advanced Mechanical Engineering & Design (Drafting Occupations II)

This course shall offer to the students an opportunity to learn the techniques, principles, and related knowledge of industrial machine drafting.  The students who undertake to solve these problems and learn these techniques will have a more realistic outlook into either the drafting or engineering field as a vocation.  Occupational opportunities include engineers, designers, layout pattern makers, draftspersons, etc. This course is designed for the serious student. It provides the background for entry into engineering or architectural drawing on the college level.  The course content includes floor plans, sectional view, elevation views, and kitchen layout.  Also emphasized are engineering drawing concepts.  The following topics will be included:  advanced multi-view, sectional and pictorial drawings, inking (both lettering and line drawings), developments, production dimensioning, welding symbols, metric drawings, and others.  Many of these drawings will be completed with our CAD (Computer Aided Drafting) System.

This course meets 10 periods per week.

Semesters:  2                                         
Level:  11, 12
Credit:  1/2 per semester
Prerequisite: Successful completion of Mechanical Engineering and Design.

Architectural Engineering & Design (Architectural Drafting I-II)

This course is designed to help the student gain an understanding of how architectural plans are developed and drawn.  Emphasis is placed on the development of the plans.  Each student shall develop a complete set of architectural plans and blueprints.  The student will be involved in the following areas of architecture:  different types of design, history, drawing a floor plan, elevations, wall sections, electrical, and foundation plans.

Semesters:  2
Level:  10, 11, 12
Credit:  1/2 per semester
Prerequisite: none

Woods I

A semester course devoted to learning the fundamental skills and knowledge in the use of hand and power woodworking tools, to use common materials employed in woodworking, and to learn safe and efficient work habits while constructing student projects.

Semesters: 1
Level:  9, 10, 11, 12
Credit:  1/2
Prerequisite:  None

Woods II

A course to provide the student with an opportunity to develop more skill in the use of tools, materials and processes in constructing projects involving planning, use of hand and power tools, and to introduce the basic operations on machines.

Semesters: 1
Level:  9, 10, 11, 12
Credit:  1/2
Prerequisite:  Woods I 

Woods III

This course is designed for students who want to study advanced Woodworking that could lead to gainful employment.  The important and more common operations of power tools such as the circular saw, saber saw, jig saw, jointer, planer, drill press, sander, wood lathe, router and router attachments are thoroughly dealt with, stressing safety for their uses.

Semesters:  1
Level:  11, 12
Credit:  1/2 per semester
Prerequisite:  Woods I & II or approval of staff

Metals I

An introductory course in metal work for the student who is interested in bench metal, sheet metal, ornamental metal, forging, heat treating, foundry, cutting, finishing, beginning welding and lathe.  Where appropriate, students will be introduced to power machinery such as the milling machine and lathe. Safe and proper use of all equipment will be stressed and reinforced during related project work and lab exercises.

Semesters:  1 
Level:  9, 10, 11, 12
Credit:  1/2
Prerequisite:  None

Metals II

This is the second course in metal work.  It is designed to expose the student to additional metalworking processes introduced in the beginning class, but major emphasis will be placed on learning to use machine tools. These include the lathe, milling machine, vertical and horizontal band saws and grinders.  The welding of metal may also be introduced.  The skill and knowledge one must have to work safely in these areas are highly stressed. Projects will be made to implement this technical material.

Semesters: 1
Level:  9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1/2
Prerequisite:  Metals I

Metals III (Manufacturing Operations I)

This is a trade preparatory program for students who plan to enter the machine or allied trades.  Course content will emphasize applying safety practices, selecting materials, performing bench work operations, performing precision measurement, performing layouts, performing housekeeping and record keeping activities and operating a variety of tools used for separating, forming and combining material. After completing the program, students should be qualified to enter industry with an understanding of fundamental machine shop operations and procedures.  The program does not attempt to make journeymen machinists, but to teach the students fundamental skills necessary to enter the trade, and to give them a background in related and technical information pertinent to the machinist trade.

Two periods each day will be devoted to practical work on a useful and productive basis; also, time is devoted to instruction in the necessary and related subjects.

The course consists of the following basic areas of machine shop work. (l) Bench and drill press work; (2) lathe work; (3) shaper work; (4) milling machine work; (5) grinding work; (6) power saw work; (7) heat treating and forging; (8) arc and gas welding; (9) sheet metal; (10) tool sharpening; (11) blueprint reading.

This course meets 5 periods per week.

Semesters:  1 
Level:  11, 12                                           
Credit:  1/2 per semester
Prerequisite:  Metals I & II or approval of instructor

Introduction to Machining

Introduction to Machining covers introductory-level machining skills used in metal manufacturing. Students learn machine shop safety and are introduced to the basics of operating drills, saw and cut off machines, lathes and mills. Students also learn inspection and quality assurance functions as they relate to a machine shop.

Semesters: 1
Level: 10, 11, 12, or with DL approval
Credit: 1/2
Prerequisite: None

CNC Precision Machining & Engineering I

This course will allow students to explore current technologies and equipment to prepare them for careers in manufacturing and engineering.  Students will work through blueprint reading and design as well as prototyping and production on current industry equipment. 

Course content would include an introduction to CNC set-up, tooling, operation, troubleshooting, as well as basic principles and applications of numerically controlled equipment and CNC machines.   Students will be exposed to a variety of CNC machines and industry technologies in this course.  Students will have the opportunity to test for NIMS (National Institute for Metalworking Skills) credentials in this course.

This course is offered in limited capacity (currently at Cary-Grove High School) and therefore students from other schools may need to travel to participate.  In these instances, students are required to provide their own transportation.

Semesters: 1
Level: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1/2
Prerequisite: C or better in any of the following: Metals I, Drafting I, Woods I, Electronics I, Small Engines, Tech Ed

CNC Precision Machining & Engineering II

In this semester course students will gain additional hours and experience on current technologies and equipment from the manufacturing and engineering industries.  Students will be able to create custom and advanced prints, prototypes, and projects on this equipment. Equipment includes: CNC Mill, CNC Lathe, CNC Router, 3D Printing, Laser Cutter, and Plasma Cutter.

Students will also have the opportunity to test for NIMS (National Institute for Metalworking Skills) credentials in this course.

This course is offered in limited capacity (currently at Cary-Grove High School) and therefore students from other schools may need to travel to participate.  In these instances, students are required to provide their own transportation.

Semesters: 1
Levels: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1/2
Prerequisite: CNC Precision Machining & Engineering I

Robotics & Drone Technology

Students will develop skills in mechanical design, digital electronics, coding, and fabrication as they work in teams to build simple and complex robotics and drone devices. Students will explore usage of robotics and drone technologies in modern business and industry, examine how these devices are affecting our lives and shaping our culture, and the career possibilities of those with knowledge of robotics and drone technology.

This course is located at Crystal Lake Central or Prairie Ridge High Schools and meets 5 periods per week.

Semesters: 1
Level: 9, 10, 11, 12 
Credit: 1/2
Prerequisite: None

Electronics I (Electricity/Electronics I)

This is a course designed for those interested in basic introduction to the field of electricity and electronics.  The scope of the course will include use of meters, direct current circuits, application of Ohm’s law, magnetism, safety and introduction to alternating current theory. Experiments will be performed using the principles learned in the course.

Semesters:  1
Level:  9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1/2
Prerequisite:  None

Electronics II (Electricity/Electronics II)

This course is designed to give a further exposure to the field of electronics and will cover the following areas:  the use of test equipment; oscilloscopes, operation and application of active devices such as diodes, transistors, and integrated circuits; alternating current theory; inductors and capacitors as applied to alternating current circuits; radio circuits and occupational information.  Experiments will be performed using principles learned in the course.

Semesters:  1
Level:  9, 10, 11, 12
Credit:  1/2 
Prerequisite:  Electronics I or approval of staff

Small Engines (Power Mech. I)

This is designed as a beginning course for the study of internal combustion engines as major sources of power.  Laboratory experiences will be provided on the proper disassembly techniques used on two and four cycle engines, basic vocabulary, concepts, attitudes and mechanical skills.  Cooperative work habits, safety and proper usage of common hand tools will be stressed in the laboratory.

Semesters:  1
Level:  9, 10, 11, 12
Credit:  1/2
Prerequisite:  None

Auto I (Auto Mechanics)

Designed as a more comprehensive study of the internal combustion engine and its related parts.  Emphasis will be placed on learning the basic principle function of the automotive engine, electrical and fuel systems.  Students will develop problem solving abilities and are required to disassemble and assemble assigned units of study.  Click link to learn more about articulated credit for this course.

Semesters:  1
Level:  10, 11, 12
Credit:  1/2 (Articulated Credit)
Prerequisite:  Small Engines

Seminar in Industrial Education

This is an individual study course designed for students who wish to do advanced study in auto, drafting, metals, or woods.  Advanced lab experiences provide opportunities for students to gain additional skills necessary for entry level employment in the Automotive Industry or advanced study at the post-secondary level.  A contract between the instructor and student spelling out objectives of the course will be kept on file. Course content will provide opportunities for students to gain additional skills necessary for entry level employment or advanced study at the post-secondary level.

This course meets 10 periods per week.

Semesters:  1-2
Level:  11, 12
Credit:  1/2 per semester
Prerequisite:  Approval of division leader

Technology Education (Orientation to Ind. Occ. I-II)

This course is designed to give students a broad based knowledge of the world of technology.  The curriculum is outcome based, self-directed, and includes hands-on experience.  The student will interact with some of the following technologies:  computer graphics, robotics, fiber/laser optics, aerodynamics, computer-aided design and manufacturing, plastics. Communications include: design, drafting, and graphic arts.

This course meets the Computer requirement for graduation.

Semesters:  1
Level:  10, 11, 12
Credit:  1/2 
Prerequisite:  None

Technology Education II ( Orientation to Ind. Occ. I-II)

This course offers advanced work in the technologies of Technology I with an emphasis on problem solving.

Semesters:  1
Level:  10, 11, 12
Credit:  1/2
Prerequisite:  B or above in Tech I

Student Technical Center

Student Technical Center (STC) is a computer technical support program.  The purpose of the program is to create a student-run help desk that equips students to provide first-line technical support to students and staff. Students in the program will also participate in an independent study curriculum and have the opportunity to gain valuable industry certifications.  Students will develop soft skills necessary for computer careers.  While not a traditional class, students will be supervised by our staff and receive academic credit.  The course is offered pass/fail; letter grades are not awarded.

Semesters:  1
Level:  9, 10, 11, 12
Credit:  1/4 Pass/Fail 
Prerequisite:  None

Honors- Project Lead the Way

Honors Introduction to Engineering Design (IED)

A year-long honors course, developed by Project Lead the Way, that teaches problem-solving skills using a design development process as it relates to the engineering field. Models of product solutions are created, analyzed and communicated using parametric solid modeling design software.  Students that successfully complete this course and meet the score criteria on the PLTW exam may be eligible to earn college credit.  Additional fees may be required as part of this process.  Please see your PLTW teacher and department chairperson for details.

This course meets the computer requirement for graduation.

Semesters:  2 
Level:  9, 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1/2 per semester
Prerequisite: Department approval (for all grade levels).  Students in grade 9 must have also successfully completed 8th grade Algebra with a C or better and/or has scored a 230 on the MAP or equivalent standardized assessment.

Honors Principles of Engineering (POE)

A year-long honors course, developed by Project Lead the Way that allows students an opportunity to explore technology systems and manufacturing processes. Students will also address the social and political consequences of technological change.  Students that successfully complete this course and meet the score criteria on the PLTW exam may be eligible to earn college credit.  Additional fees may be required as part of this process.  Please see your PLTW teacher and department chairperson for details.

Semesters: 2
Level: 10, 11, 12
Credit: 1/2 per semester
Prerequisites: Students in grade 10 must have successfully completed Introduction to Engineering (IED).  Students in grades 11 and 12 that have not participated in PLTW coursework before must seek department approval.

Honors Digital Electronics (DE)

A year-long honors course developed by Project Lead the Way that allows students an opportunity to learn electronic circuitry. Students will be provided opportunities to construct and test for functionality.  Students that successfully complete this course and meet the score criteria on the PLTW exam may be eligible to earn college credit.  Additional fees may be required as part of this process.  Please see your PLTW teacher and department chairperson for details.

Semesters:  2
Level:  10, 11, 12
Credit: 1/2 per semester
Prerequisites: Students in grade 10 must have successfully completed IED or POE.  Students in grades 11 and 12 that have not participated in PLTW coursework before must seek department approval.

Honors Engineering Design & Development (EDD)

A capstone year-long honors course developed by Project Lead the Way, in which students work in teams to research, design, test, and construct a solution to an open-ended engineering problem. The product development life cycle and a design process are used to guide and help the team to reach a solution to the problem. The team presents and defends their solution to a panel of outside reviewers at the conclusion of the course. The EDD course allows students to apply all the skills and knowledge learned in previous Project Lead the Way courses.  Students that successfully complete this course and meet the score criteria on the PLTW exam may be eligible to earn college credit.  Additional fees may be required as part of this process.  Please see your PLTW teacher and department chairperson for details.  This course is offered in limited capacity and therefore students may need to travel to another school to participate.  In these instances, students are required to provide their own transportation.

Semesters:  2
Level: 12
Credit: 1/2 per semester
Prerequisites: Successful completion of two foundation PLTW courses including IED, POE, or DE.

Advanced Placement®/Dual Credit

Auto II (Auto Service Occupations I)

This is a vocational trade preparatory in-school course designed for students who are planning to enter the auto mechanics or allied fields for gainful employment.  The students will learn the tools of the trade, personal benefits, problems of the trade, power transmission systems, and basic diagnostic skills necessary for this occupational field.  Two periods each day will be devoted to practical work on cars in our auto mechanics shop doing operations that include tune-ups, engine replacements, fuel systems, electrical systems, engine testing, cooling systems, brakes, steering, etc.  Click link to learn more on articulated and dual credit for this course.

This course meets at Cary-Grove High School 10 periods per week.

Semesters: 
Level:  11, 12                                      
Credit:  1/2 per semester (Dual Credit/Articulated)
Prerequisite:  Small Engines, Auto I or approval of staff

 

Contact Us

Matt Timmerman
Director of Curriculum
Email: mtimmerman@d155.org

Michael Manning
Cary-Grove High School
Division Lead
Email: mmanning@d155.org

Bob Hewett
Crystal Lake Central High School
Division Lead
Email: rhewett@d155.org

Michelle Kidd
Crystal Lake South High School
Division Lead
Email: mkidd@d155.org

Kevin Koeppen
Prairie Ridge High School
Division Lead
Email: kkoeppen@d155.org